Marting-Lowry

Andrew Clark Lowry and Nellie Marting Lowry

Andrew Clark Lowry was born on March 4, 1870 in West Virginia. He was the son of Lee and Mary
Patterson Lowry and one of four children. His brother Dr. J. C. Lowry and sisters, Alice and Dr. Sarah (Saide) Lowry were also born at the family home in West Virginia.

Andrew began his medical career when he graduated from Louisville Medical College. He went on
to practice medicine for twenty-years.

On February 10, 1897, Andrew married Nellie Marting. Nellie was the daughter of Col. Henry Adam Marting and Margaret Duis Marting and born on July 24, 1875. Nellie was an Ironton High School and Balwin-Wallace College (in Berea) graduate. The couple lived in their home on South 5th Street.
In September 1919, Nellie’s father died. Nellie began to manage the Martin Estate.

Andrew became not only a successful and respected doctor, he became a good businessman. His actions resulted in the formation of the Ironton Hotel Company and the construction of the Marting Hotel. He was president and director of the Marting Hotel, Foster Stove Company, and Marting Iron and Steel Company. A.C. was the vice president and director of the Citizens National Bank and director of the First National Bank. He campaigned to raise money for the Ironton-Russell Bridge. Once the bridge was built, he was one of the first directors of the Ironton-Russell Bridge Company. A.C. was on the board of directors of the Home Building and Loan Company. Lastly, he was a member of the chamber of commerce, Rotary Club, the Elks Lodge and the First Methodist Episcopal Church.

Andrew remained active up until four weeks before his death when he suffered a stroke. He died on March 1, 1924.

Nellie moved to her family homestead to live with her mother after Andrew’s death. Her mother died in 1933. Nellie continued to manager her interests in the Foster Stove Company, Marting Iron and Steel Company, Citizens Bank, Marlow building and the Marting Hotel.

Nellie was the last member of the Lowry family. She died after being bedfast for six months on May 12, 1937 at her home on 5th and Adams.