Martial Law in Hanging Rock

Martial Law Declared in Hanging Rock

Arrest of Youth for Shooting Mine Superintendent Precipitates Disturbance
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Governor of Ohio Sends Soldiers to Scene at Ironton and Crowds Disperse

“San Francisco Call, Volume 96, Number 2. June 2, 1904
June 1 – Four companies of the militia were today ordered to proceed to Hanging Rock, near Ironton, on the Ohio River. Governor Henrick ordered out Company K of Portsmouth, Company I of Ironton and two companies from Gallipolis and Manchester. Colonel A.C. Thompson assumed command. The companies left at once for Hanging Rock on a special train.

The arrest of James Fuller, a young striker, on suspicion of having shot superintendent William Jeffries of the Hanging Rock Iron Company, precipitated serious trouble today. Fuller was arrested by The arrest of James Fuller, a young strlker, on suspicion of having shot Superintendent William Jeffries of the Hanging Rock Iron Company, precipitated serious trouble to-day. Fuller was arrested by Constable Kinkaid and the strikers did not take the arrest in pleasant spirit. They gathered in groups to discuss it. Both sides to the controversy assumed a threatening attitude and Sheriff Payne of this city was called upon for assistance. He investigated and found the situation critical. He thereupon called for troops and his call was approved by the Governor. When the troops arrived this afternoon Hanging Rock was placed under martial law and the crowds were dispersed. Harvey Reed, who refused to obey the troops, was arrested. James Fuller was also arrested on a charge preferred before the troops arrived.

 

 

 

Indianapolis Journal, Volume 54, Number 154,Indianapolis, Marion County, 2 June 1904

IRONTON, O., June 1. Hanging Rock. the scene of the outbreak between striker and nonunion men employed by the Hanging Rock Iron Company, is now under martial law. The crowd of armed striker have been dispersed and the furnace
district is comparatively quiet tonight. The third battalion of the Ohio National Guard is now at Hanging Rock. Col. A. C. Thompson Is in command of the troops, including Company K of Portsmouth. Company I of Ironton and two companies from Gallipolis and Manchester, under command of Major Howe, of the Seventh Infantry.

When the troops arrived this afternoon Hanging Rock was placed under martial law and the crowds were dispersed. Harvey Reed, who refused to obey the troops, was arrested. The trouble today started when a lot of Winchesters arrived for the nonunion men by a steamboat. The strikers then turned out, parading the streets with their Winchesters and threatening the nonunion men wherever found, especially the colored men who had taken the places of strikers in the furnaces. It was announced at the same time that the new men were also armed. It was feared that a serious collision would occur at any time and a reign of terror existed over what was expected during the night. The arrest of James Fuller, a young striker on suspicion of having shot Superintendent William Jeffries, of the Hanging; Rock Iron Company, precipitated serious trouble before the troops arrived. Fuller was arrested by Constable Klncaid and the strikers did not take the arrest In pleasant spirit. They gathered in groups to discuss it. Both sides to the controversy assumed threatening attitudes and Sheriff Payne, of this city, was called upon for assistance. He investigated and found the situation critical. He thereupon called for troops, and his call was approved by Governor Herrick, who ordered out the third battalion. The trouble at the furnaces In the Hanging Rock district is due to the attempt to supply the places or strikers with nonunion men, many of the latter being negroes from Virginia. There were several collisions last Sunday. in one of which Albert Sperry was seriously hurt. On Monday night an attack was made on an old church where a party of nonunionists had taken refuge and 300 shots were exchanged. Later Superintendent Jeffries, of the Hamilton furnace, was shot, but not seriously hurt. There were few casualties, considering the extent of the shooting.